divinedebris

After "Don't rape" and "Don't threaten rape" what's the best way for men to improve the lives of women and girls in geekdom? from Anonymous

postcardsfromspace:

Okay, look: “Don’t rape” and “don’t threaten rape” are pinpoint-specific parts of social compact, also known as “the bare minimum expectations for getting to be part of society.”

These are things that should be taken as a given. Don’t hold up ”don’t rape” and “don’t threaten rape” like they are gifts.

I mean, don’t do those things, and deter others from doing them, and talk about all of this, but, fuck, man.

Anyway.

The best way men can improve the lives of women and girls in geekdom is to do their damnedest to shift the balance of power. Geek dudes—especially white geek dudes—you have something the ladies do not: you have a platform from which to speak about issues of justice with relative impunity. Use it. Better yet, share it with or give it to someone who does not have that privilege.

Are you a pro on a panel that’s all white dudes? Give up your seat to a woman of color. Encourage other panelists to do the same. Straight-up refuse to be part of panels that do not work toward equal representation. Hold speaker and guest lists at cons to the same standard. And talk about what you are doing, and why.

If you are in a position that gives you hiring power, hire women—especially into positions where they will have power, not just low-level editorial and work-for-hire gigs. Actively seek and use the input of women, and go out of your way to make really damn sure they’re credited for those contributions

Seek and vocally advocate for works by and about women, for female-friendly and generally diversity-friendly publishers, retailers, and fan communities. When someone does shit right, vote with your dollars and spread the word. When someone fucks up, call them out, and—if there’s any real potential for it and you’ve got the capacity—offer them impetus for and tools to change.

Buy girl books. Buy books with pink covers, and read them in public. Break down the box of geek masculinity, and live the geek culture you want to see and be part of. Subvert everything.

Meanwhile: Hold other men accountable. Don’t tell rape jokes. Call out bullshit.

And respect the anger of those of us who have been consistently marginalized. If you want to be an ally in this fight, recognize that the fight is not about you: sometimes solidarity means giving other people space to be frustrated and angry at a system from which you directly benefit, and sometimes that means that they will, by extension, be angry at you—and that this, along with everything else, means *that system* is your common enemy.

Speaking of systems: Educate yourself. Read How to Suppress Women’s Writing and call that shit out. Understand that in this fight, your voice is generally considered to mean more than mine. Fight that inequality as hard as you can—but meanwhile, while you’ve got that platform, use it.


Companies paid an average effective federal tax rate of 12.6 percent in 2010, the last time the Government Accountability Office measured the rate. That compares with the nominal federal tax rate of 35 percent, so all those accountants appear to have done their jobs in exploiting the loopholes in our tax code.

The chairman of the House Ways and Means Committee, Representative Dave Camp, a Michigan Republican, proposed a vast reform of our tax code this year, eliminating a lot of the Swiss cheese that makes it so porous and, arguably, unfair. Mr. Camp’s proposal, as you might imagine, isn’t gaining a lot of traction.

In recognition of Uncle Sam’s payday, it’s only proper to take note of some of the most egregious corporate tax loopholes and some unexpected beneficiaries.

■ For the last seven years, a debate has raged over the “carried interest” benefit taken by private equity and hedge fund executives. Instead of paying ordinary rates on much of their income — typically 35 percent for the highest bracket (39.6 percent for this tax year) — these executives pay the capital gains rate of 15 percent. It’s a clear loophole that is plainly unfair. Despite repeated efforts to repeal it, the loophole has remained, in part because of well-financed industry lobbying in Washington.

■ If individual taxpayers are arrested, admit guilt and reach a civil settlement with the government, they cannot deduct the costs from their returns. But amazingly, a company is allowed to claim those costs as a business expense. JPMorgan Chase, for example, which has agreed to pay billions of dollars in fines for various transgressions, can deduct a large portion — and all the legal expenses — from its taxes.

■ A tiny but symbolic loophole still persists. Companies that own aircraft can depreciate their planes more quickly than airlines — over five years instead of seven — and claim the deduction. In total, closing the loophole is worth $3 billion to $4 billion over a decade.

■ A much larger loophole involves the deduction of executive stock options by the company issuing them. Inexplicably, many of Silicon Valley’s newest star companies will be able to shelter a large portion of their profits as a result. Citizens for Tax Justice estimated late last year that a dozen technology companies, including Twitter, LinkedIn and Priceline, “stand to eliminate all income taxes on the next $11.4 billion they earn — giving these companies $4 billion in tax cuts.”

The New York Times, "Looking at Some Corporate Tax Loopholes Ordinary Citizens May Envy."

H&R cockblock.

(via inothernews)


blantonmuseum:

Happy 125th birthday to Thomas Hart Benton! His painting Romance is a visitor favorite—celebrate by seeing it in person.
A painter and muralist celebrated for his regional scenes of daily life in the southern, midwestern, and western United States, Thomas Hart Benton was committed to portraying images of progress and satisfaction in the American heartland. Born to a family of statesmen, Benton was a patriot who saw his art as a means to generate social and political reform. His nostalgic and uplifting scenes of hard work, self-reliance, and individualism garnered broad popular appeal in post–World War I America. This work, painted when the artist was at the midpoint of his life, provides a lyrical view of a young couple on a relaxed evening stroll. Drawing on his knowledge of both Old Master techniques and modernist ideas, which he had gleaned from several years spent studying in Paris, Benton crafted a lively composition whose rhythmic alignment of forms conveys a sense of poignant familiarity
Thomas Hart Benton, Romance, 1931-32, tempera and oil varnish glazes on gesso panel on board, Gift of Mari and James A. Michener, 1991.
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blantonmuseum:

Happy 125th birthday to Thomas Hart Benton! His painting Romance is a visitor favorite—celebrate by seeing it in person.

A painter and muralist celebrated for his regional scenes of daily life in the southern, midwestern, and western United States, Thomas Hart Benton was committed to portraying images of progress and satisfaction in the American heartland. Born to a family of statesmen, Benton was a patriot who saw his art as a means to generate social and political reform. His nostalgic and uplifting scenes of hard work, self-reliance, and individualism garnered broad popular appeal in post–World War I America. This work, painted when the artist was at the midpoint of his life, provides a lyrical view of a young couple on a relaxed evening stroll. Drawing on his knowledge of both Old Master techniques and modernist ideas, which he had gleaned from several years spent studying in Paris, Benton crafted a lively composition whose rhythmic alignment of forms conveys a sense of poignant familiarity

Thomas Hart Benton, Romance, 1931-32, tempera and oil varnish glazes on gesso panel on board, Gift of Mari and James A. Michener, 1991.


helpsaveourheroes:

iamdeathoftheendless:

OMG my friend posted this to my page. I knew about the marketing issues but of the thing about “girls” is true I am super mother fucking pissed!!!!!! And it’s Keven Smith talking!

Ugh I brushed this post off when I first came across it because I thought it was just an Internet rumor or something, but I just listened to the podcast and it’s true. I am burning right now. Paul Dini said he didn’t specifically hear anyone at CN saying this in regards to YJ, but they did mention it as the reason why they cancelled Dini’s show Tower Prep so it’s not far-fetched to think they cancelled YJ for the same reason. CN you suck so much more than I could have ever imagined.

I read a terrible post about this on The Mary Sue. What the hell? Seriously, I loved that show and I guess, as an icky girl, I am not the demographic. helpsaveourheroes:

iamdeathoftheendless:

OMG my friend posted this to my page. I knew about the marketing issues but of the thing about “girls” is true I am super mother fucking pissed!!!!!! And it’s Keven Smith talking!

Ugh I brushed this post off when I first came across it because I thought it was just an Internet rumor or something, but I just listened to the podcast and it’s true. I am burning right now. Paul Dini said he didn’t specifically hear anyone at CN saying this in regards to YJ, but they did mention it as the reason why they cancelled Dini’s show Tower Prep so it’s not far-fetched to think they cancelled YJ for the same reason. CN you suck so much more than I could have ever imagined.

I read a terrible post about this on The Mary Sue. What the hell? Seriously, I loved that show and I guess, as an icky girl, I am not the demographic. 

helpsaveourheroes:

iamdeathoftheendless:

OMG my friend posted this to my page. I knew about the marketing issues but of the thing about “girls” is true I am super mother fucking pissed!!!!!! And it’s Keven Smith talking!

Ugh I brushed this post off when I first came across it because I thought it was just an Internet rumor or something, but I just listened to the podcast and it’s true. I am burning right now. Paul Dini said he didn’t specifically hear anyone at CN saying this in regards to YJ, but they did mention it as the reason why they cancelled Dini’s show Tower Prep so it’s not far-fetched to think they cancelled YJ for the same reason. CN you suck so much more than I could have ever imagined.

I read a terrible post about this on The Mary Sue. What the hell? Seriously, I loved that show and I guess, as an icky girl, I am not the demographic.